Two, prepare for those fights. Much of the next four years will be reactive, but we can prepare somewhat. The more we can convince corporate America to delete their saved archives of surveillance data and to store only what they need for as long as they need it, the safer we'll all be. We need to convince Internet giants like Google and Facebook to change their business models away from surveillance capitalism. It's a hard sell, but maybe we can nibble around the edges. Similarly, we need to keep pushing the truism that privacy and security are not antagonistic, but rather are essential for each other.

Three, lay the groundwork for a better future. No matter how bad the next four years get, I don't believe that a Trump administration will permanently end privacy, freedom, and liberty in the US. I don't believe that it portends a radical change in our democracy. (Or if it does, we have bigger problems than a free and secure Internet.) It's true that some of Trump's institutional changes might take decades to undo. Even so, I am confident -- optimistic even -- that the US will eventually come around; and when that time comes, we need good ideas in place for people to come around to. This means proposals for non-surveillance-based Internet business models, research into effective law enforcement that preserves privacy, intelligent limits on how corporations can collect and exploit our data, and so on.